Smoke from Yosemite-area Rim fire fills Carson Valley

SmokeMain-cvt-082213Humphrey

Smoke colored the Valley an eerie amber color Thursday afternoon. Photo courtesy of John T. Humphrey/ http://www.akawolf.com

Smoke from the 54,000-acre Rim fire near Yosemite dumped into Carson Valley just before noon Thursday.

Douglas County Emergency Management and The Bureau of Pollution Control (BOPC) are closely monitoring air quality concerns.

The Rim Fire in Sonora, California grew from 16,000 acres Wednesday to 54,000 acres Thursday.

The most recent air samples from this afternoon put the current air quality in the upper end of the “moderate” level in the Carson Valley. This is likely to move into the “unsafe” category within the next few hours. It is recommended that individuals consider limiting strenuous outdoor activity to reduce the risk of adverse health effects.

People who may be especially sensitive to elevated levels of pollutants include the very young, the elderly and those with pre-existing respiratory problems such as asthma and/or heart disease.  Those with symptoms should consider consulting with their personal physician.

National Weather Service imagery of the smoke coming from the Rim fire.

National Weather Service imagery of the smoke coming from the Rim fire.

Carson Valley Medical Center released a plea for Valley residents to stay inside while the smoke remains in the area.

Smoke is made up of a complex mixture of gases and fine particles produced when wood and other organic matter burn,” the release said. “The biggest health threat from smoke comes from fine particles. These microscopic particles can get into your eyes and respiratory system, where they can cause health problems such as burning eyes, runny nose, and illnesses such as bronchitis. Fine particles also can aggravate chronic heart and lung diseases – and even are linked to premature deaths in people with these conditions.

“The smoke in the air can irritate the eyes and airways, causing coughing, a scratchy throat, irritated sinuses, headaches, stinging eyes or a runny nose. If you have heart or lung disease, smoke might make your symptoms worse.

Smoke1-cvt-082213NWS

“Some people are more susceptible than others when the air gets smoky. If you have heart or lung disease, such as congestive heart failure, angina, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema or asthma, you may experience health effects earlier and at lower smoke levels than healthy people.

Photo courtesy of Chris Dickerson

Photo courtesy of Chris Dickerson

“Older adults are more likely to be affected by smoke, possibly because they are more likely to have heart or lung diseases than younger people.

“Children also are more susceptible to smoke for several reasons: their respiratory systems are still developing; they breathe more air (and air pollution) per pound of body weight than adults; and they’re more likely to be active outdoors.

“If you are concerned with any symptoms related to the air quality, it is recommended you contact your physician or seek immediate medical assistance if necessary.”

Photo courtesy of Phyllis Johnson on Wildhorse off of Stephanie Way.

Photo courtesy of Phyllis Johnson on Wildhorse off of Stephanie Way.

Photo courtesy of Susan Schmid

Photo courtesy of Susan Schmid

Photo courtesy of Evan Jones

Photo courtesy of Evan Jones

Photo courtesy of Michael Chapton

Photo courtesy of Michael Chapton

Comparison before/after shot from the same location, courtesy of Michael Chapton

Comparison before/after shot from the same location, courtesy of Michael Chapton

Photo courtesy of Michael Chapton

Photo courtesy of Michael Chapton

Before/After shot from Dahlia Super

Before/After shot from Dahlia Super

 

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